To fully explore all the structures please scroll down.

Founders National Bank – Oklahoma

Located in Oklahoma City, the Founders National Bank is another fine example of Space-Age architecture.  The 1964 structure was designed by architect Bob Bowlby.  As with the Cocoa Beach Glass Bank, the building underwent modifications but its original lines remained distinct.

For additional information please visit okcmod.com

Founders National Bank - Photo: Bob Bowlby via okcmod.com

Founders National Bank – Photo: Bob Bowlby via okcmod.com

Oklahoma State Capitol Bank – Continued

As with the Cocoa Beach Glass Bank this bank had an underground vault. What is absolutely fascinating with the Oklahoma State Capitol Bank is the elevator to reach the vault. Bank patrons would sit in this circular conversation area and it served as an elevator to their safety deposit boxes.

 

Getty Images

Getty Images

Oklahoma State Capitol Bank

Designed by architect Robert Roloff, the Oklahoma State Capitol Bank is another fine example of Space-Age influence on early 1960s architecture. The structure consists of an impressive 17 ‘flying saucers’ with expansive exterior glass walls. The bank opened in 1964 with construction costs estimated at $500,000.

Additional information regarding architect Robert Roloff can be found at this site.

First 8 photos: Julius Schulman

Santa Fe Federal Savings & Loan

Santa Fe Savings & Loan

Santa Fe Savings & Loan is today the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center

The Santa Fe Federal Savings & Loan was a wonderful Desert Modern Style in Palm Springs, California. Today, it is home to the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center. In addition to be a wonderful representation of Savings & Loan modern architecture, it has a direct link to the First Federal Savings & Loan of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach Branch – our Glass Bank. It has the same vault door as the Glass Bank and their vault is still in use today – only it is now the gift shop for the museum.

Bob Prine’s Skyline Room

Bob Prine’s Skyline Room was directly across the state in St. Petersburg. Like Ramon’s Rainbow Room it sat atop a new Savings & Loan building – The Security Federal Savings & Loan Association of St. Petersburg. Designed by W.A. Sarmiento of the Bank Building & Equipment Corporation of America, the 7 story structure appears to have been influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Opened in 1961, construction costs were an estimated $900,000.

Savings & Loan Patron Gifts

 

In an era of trading stamps at the supermarket gifts and perks were plentiful.   Sure, everyone remembers when banks and savings & loans provided toasters when you opened a new savings account, but the gifts did not stop there.   Many savings institutions in the 1960s gave-a-way piggy banks shaped like rockets for the kids to save their change – while the adults received these cool glass dishes to catch your change on the dresser. Not to be left out of the practice, the First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Cocoa offered one of the Glass Bank.

Orlando Round Building

Constructed in 1963 the American Federal Savings & Loan Building, locally referred to as the Round Building, was known for its expansive concrete brise-soleil. Jack Jennings & Sons served as the construction firm for the downtown Orlando building. During the 1970s, a five story glass office structure was added atop the original two floors. Ironically, not only would the Round Building and Cocoa Beach Glass Bank both face demolition in late 2014/ early 2015 – it would be conducted by the same demolition firm.

round_building

Round building in the 1960s – Orlando Weekly image